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A Growing Green Debt?

As PACE takes off, realtors warn that unwary homeowners are complicating their finances

Call it the tale of two turfs. In summer 2014, 27-year-old Benjamin Triffo wanted to do something about his dry, unattractive yard. He owns a four-bedroom, four-bath duplex in Elk Grove that he’d bought in 2011, and his sprinkler lines were broken. But with the state passing rules last July that would allow fines for overwatering, Triffo quickly figured out that replacing his system and re-sodding would be like attaching a drain line to his checkbook.

Feb 23, 2016 Steven Yoder

California Reports 49 Million Records Breached in Four Years

More than 49 million personal information records of California residents were compromised in 657 data breaches from 2012 to 2015, state Attorney General Kamala Harris said in a report citing tips on how people and businesses can protect themselves.

Feb 19, 2016 Joel Rosenblatt
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Return of the Single Female Homebuyer

For decades, single women played an important role in the U.S. housing market, buying more homes than single men. But after the housing crisis, lenders made it harder to qualify for mortgages, and the percentage of single female buyers dropped from 21 percent of purchasers in 2009 to 15 percent this year. Now, they may be poised to make a comeback.

Jan 8, 2016 Patrick Clark
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Here’s What Your Bonus Might Look Like This Year

While most workers don’t expect to get a little extra something from their bosses this year, many companies are, in fact, doling out holiday bonuses. Of 368 human resource professionals and executives surveyed in Bloomberg BNA’s annual Year End-Holiday Practices survey, 42 percent said that they planned to give end-of-year bonuses, with most employers opting for cash over gifts. 

Dec 18, 2015 Rebecca Greenfield
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Student Debt Can Hurt Women More Than Men

It will take women MBAs a year longer than men to pay back their student loans, according to our analysis of Bloomberg data, gleaned from our annual ranking of MBA programs.

Dec 10, 2015 Natalie Kitroeff & Jonathan Rodkin
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Budget-Busting Childcare Costs Are Talk of U.S. Campaign Trail

Policy makers are responding to the cries of parents who are forced to choose between paying childcare bills, which have climbed more than twice as fast as overall inflation since the end of 1990, or foregoing work. The soaring costs crowd out other forms of household spending, distorting the biggest part of the U.S. economy.

Nov 24, 2015 Michelle Jamrisko
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Calpers Pushes Boards to Clear Room for the Young and Ethnic

The $294 billion California Public Employees’ Retirement System is taking aim at older, white men on corporate boards with a proposed policy aimed at adding more women, minorities and gays to key positions at the largest U.S. companies. Raymond, five years older than the bank’s recommended retirement age of 72, exemplifies that group.

Nov 13, 2015 Alison Vekshin
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10 Year-End Tax Strategies

Important tax legislation that becomes retroactive to the beginning of the year is often not finalized until late in the year. Obviously, this leaves very little wiggle room for tax planning. To get ahead in your preparations, there are things you can think about or do now, to avoid a rush come December.

Nov 9, 2015 Lauren Anderson
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You Can’t Work Your Way Through College Anymore

Working to pay for college doesn’t work. Despite the fact that 40 percent of undergraduates work at least 30 hours per week while in college, tuition is too high for those hours to make much of a difference, a new report shows.

Oct 30, 2015 Sarah Grant
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Prosperity Is Good for Marriage, and Vice Versa

A new report from AEI and the Institute of Family Studies shows that the share of married adults, and especially married parents, are associated with higher per-capita gross domestic product and lower levels of violent crime.

Oct 29, 2015 Megan McArdle
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What That Chip in Your New Credit Card Means for You

The credit cards in most Americans’ wallets are pretty much antiques. They’re easy to counterfeit, thanks to magnetic strips that rely on basically the same 1960s technology used in cassette tapes. At last they’re getting an upgrade, giving them the technology, called EMV chips, used almost everywhere else in the world. 

Oct 2, 2015 Ben Steverman
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How to Make Managing Your Money Less Scary: Do it Over Eggs and Bacon

“Everyone’s stressed out about money, everyone’s nervous, everyone’s embarrassed about it, everyone thinks they’re making all these mistakes and they’re the only ones doing it. The idea of getting to relax and have a meal with somebody just changes the conversation and changes the atmosphere.”

Sep 29, 2015 Natalie Kitroeff
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Minimum Wage Increase: Bad Medicine for a Recovering Economy

Increases in large metropolitan cities are not comparable to the regional economy that is growing in Sacramento

Trends in politics take hold as quickly as those in fashion, and minimum wage increases are definitely “in” this political season. But unlike in the past when Capitol Hill and state legislatures served as battlegrounds for minimum wage debates, cities are now the epicenter. Buoyed by increases enacted in a handful of megacities, American municipalities of all sizes have started asking whether they should follow suit, and if so, to what degree.

Sep 2, 2015 Peter Tateishi
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How to Make a Living as a Yogi

Financially sustainable best practices for yogapreneurs

Yoga instructors keep so many of us fit, grounded, mindful, focused and from going postal. Which is why I decided to put my professional talents to work on a market research project for yogapreneurs. The notion was solidified over coffee with one of my favorite yogis who agreed that what yogapreneurs need is what they can’t afford: the strategy and market insights to support their passion-fueled careers.

Aug 27, 2015 MaryJayne Zemer