Posed for Growth

Sacramento's yoga market thrives

In a Thursday morning’s darkness, the hardwood floor of Yoga Shala is covered wall to wall in rubber mats. Seated, students center their breath as instructor Tyler Langdale begins the Vinyasa class.

Oct 1, 2011 Andrea Kennedy

Who Cares?

Determining the best care option for your loved one

When a family member needs more care than you’re able to give, you may automatically think they need to be placed in a nursing home. However, that’s not always the case, according to Jason Pollock, administrator of Oak Ridge Health Care Center in Roseville.

Sep 1, 2011 Carol Crenshaw

Working lunch with Beth Walter

In 2002 Michael Walter was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, but to his wife, Beth, the diagnosis just didn’t seem to fit the symptoms. So she Googled “ALS brain-related disease” — frontotemporal degeneration popped up.

Apr 1, 2011 Douglas Curley
Ken Rogaski, Mercy Healthcare of Sacramento

Exec Strategy

Health care plans for top management

Consider the annual physical and why both doctors and America’s work force find them frustrating: The worker has to carve out time to take all the exams and tests, often in different locations and on different days, and doctors lament the lack of time to discuss the results with patients.

Mar 1, 2011 Robert Celaschi
Doctor's are able to micromanage their patients' dosage of bioidentical hormones using compounding pharmacies such as Advantge Pharmaceuticals in Rocklin.

Fountain of Youth

The role of bioidentical hormones during menopause

Unless you get on the wrong airplane or harbor a relentless cancer, doctors say you can pretty much count on living to be 90. A hundred years ago, it was age 50. For many women, that would have meant dying before menopause. Now it means living half a lifetime with hormones on the fritz.

Oct 1, 2010 Christine Calvin
Heather Phillips has been in the hospital for nearly five years. She is visited regularly by Sherm and Sandy Waldman and their West Highland white terrier as a part of a palliative care program at Sutter Roseville Medical Center.

Balancing the Burdens

Helping patients and hospitals make difficult choices

A growing senior population is changing the way society approaches life and death. “People are dying differently now,” says Judy Citko, executive director of the Coalition for Compassionate Care. In the past, patients had to choose between giving up on treatment or forging ahead with sometimes drastic measures. In contrast to the traditional focus on treatment of individual episodes at any physical and financial cost, medical experts, patients and their families are demanding a new way of approaching their final months and years.

Sep 1, 2010 JT Long

Brain Attack

The financial aftermath for stroke victims

Nearly 800,000 Americans have a new or recurrent stroke each year, making it the leading cause of disability in the U.S. What’s more, health problems are a principle driver for mortgage foreclosures and personal bankruptcies, leading to billions in financial impact.

May 3, 2010 Bill Romanelli