The Long Pint of the Law

McGeorge professor develops unique course on the legalities around craft beer

In 1971, UC Davis became the first university in the country to add a fermentation science major to its undergraduate course catalog. However, even though — nearly five decades later — California is nearing 1,000 craft breweries, and despite the legal and regulatory morass that awaits every new brewery owner, Dan Croxall believes that earlier this year, he conducted the first-ever craft beer law class at an American law school.

Nov 16, 2018 Daniel Barnes

Poizner’s Independent Run Has a Red Tint

Insurance commissioner candidate Steve Poizner is shunning partisanship in his bid to become the first no-party-preference candidate to win statewide office in California. But to pay for his campaign, the former Republican has turned to people he knows best when it comes to raising money: Republicans.

Oct 23, 2018 By Dan Morain

What’s Behind All Those Dmv Voter-Registration Snafus?

The DMV gave the public a series of piecemeal explanations as it acknowledged making more than 100,000 errors in recent months in registering Californians to vote. Software problems, it said in May. Human errors from toggling between computer windows, it said in September. Data entry mistakes that were corrected but never saved, it said this month.

Oct 19, 2018 By Laurel Rosenhall

Disaster Contractor Gives Big Money to California Dems

A Florida-based company accused of botching the clean-up after last year’s devastating fires in Santa Rosa has jumped into California politics, writing big checks to Gavin Newsom’s gubernatorial campaign and the California Democratic Party.

Oct 12, 2018 By Laurel Rosenhall

How Stroopwafels Helped Sacramento Legalize Food Bikes

Dutchman’s Stroopwafels may be the first business to cook on a bicycle in Sacramento, but local entrepreneurs have been finding creative ways to combine the area’s twin passions for cuisine and cycles for decades.

Oct 8, 2018 Jennifer Fergesen

Also on the November Ballot? Lots and Lots of School Bonds

Californians in November will weigh billions of dollars’ worth of ballot measures for low-income housing, children’s hospitals and more. But one of the biggest asks will be mostly invisible to most voters—100 or more local proposals to sell bonds for school construction projects that, if passed, could total more than $12 billion in local borrowing in coming years.

Oct 4, 2018 By Ricardo Cano

Gig Companies Beg for Relief from Pro-Labor Supreme Court Ruling

State and federal labor laws give employees a wide range of worker protections, from overtime pay and minimum wages to the right to unionize. But those rights don’t extend to independent contractors, whose ranks have grown dramatically in the gig economy.

Sep 4, 2018 By Antoinette Siu