Selected Artists Tour Golden 1 Center Site

Artists in hard hats toured the Golden 1 Center construction site during the first week of September to get a first-hand look at the locations selected for four public art projects. Shelly Willis, executive director of the Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission, led four orientation sessions for the 17 artists who have been selected to submit proposals in late October.

Sep 8, 2015 Joan Cusick
photo: Jessa Ciel

WAL Street

Meet some of R Street Corridor’s newest neighbors

Energy: That’s the word that gets repeated often around the Warehouse Artist Lofts on R Street between 11th and 12th streets, and for good reason: The mixed-use loft project is teeming with artists, creative retailers and enterprising restaurants whose diversity is matched only by the eclectic mix of business owners who have bought into developer Ali Youssefi’s plan for the building.

Aug 19, 2015 John Blomster
(Shutterstock)

Pull Up a Chair

Restaurateurs are feasting on expansion opportunities across Sacramento

Around the Sacramento region, the Mulvaney’s attitude is rare. So many other chefs and owners are taking up those offers or have their own plans to expand. 2015 is proving to be a banner year for restaurant expansions, and as Sacramento’s new Golden 1 Arena rises, 2016 will surely continue the trend. Here’s just a partial lineup of what’s shaking down around the region:

Aug 17, 2015 Rick Kushman

Rebirth of a Neon Landmark

CADA helps 1940s sign survive into the 21st century

On a rainy September morning, a long-time 16th Street resident was pulled away from home, dirty, faded and in disrepair. Nine months later, its homecoming was cause for celebration. And in between, the Mercury Cleaners sign was restored, re-engineered, re-wired, repainted and returned to its 1947 glory.

Jul 7, 2015 Joan Cusick
Good Shepherd Catholic Church, Elk Grove(Photo: Russell Abraham Photography)

Sacred Spaces

Houses of worship that are worthy of praise

Houses of worship are an important element in Sacramento’s architectural history. From century-old churches to facilities that incorporate modern and sustainable technologies, religious buildings knit together the very fabric of the communities they serve. Here, we feature five local houses of worship, each with its own unique story.

Jun 16, 2015 Laurie Lauletta-Boshart
Anthony Padilla has been spray painting murals since 1995. He snagged his first job at a bar in Citrus Heights after illegally painting a monkey on the back of the building with the word “Knucklehead.”

The Law of Art

On the streets with graffiti artist and muralist Anthony Padilla

When asked if the perception of graffiti art has softened over time, artist Anthony Padilla pauses before tentatively responding, “A little bit. Obviously vandalism is wrong, but then there’s also the art side of [graffiti]. I think when you see writing on a wall, it shows that there is life in that city.” 

Jun 5, 2015 Allison Joy
(Photo: Sara Washington)

Stockmarket Goes Up in Forlorn Downtown Stockton

New market seeks to revitalize area by showcasing local artisans

Amy Sieffert, a Stockton native, has been running a vintage clothing business since 2010 — but she had to leave her hometown to make a profit. On weekends, she would travel to Sacramento and the Bay Area because there were no local makers markets where she lived. To help turn this ghost town into a local hotspot, Sieffert and business partner Katie Macrae created the Stockmarket, a seasonal market that showcases Central Valley artisans.

Jun 3, 2015 Russell Nichols
(Shutterstock)

Level Up

The Capital Region is cashing in on the big business of comic conventions

Comic-themed conventions, or cons, have been around since the 1970s. Even the Capital Region has had its own Sac-Con since 1989. In those days, the events were small affairs attended by a hard-core smattering of lonely youth and middle-aged men speaking their own jargon-filled language. But in the past five years, something changed. Cons became cool.

May 19, 2015 Bill Romanelli
(Shutterstock)

Comic Crash

How offing Superman almost killed the comic industry

The day Superman died, I was one of millions of people in line throughout the country. It turned out that I could not have picked a worse time than the early 1990s to start collecting comics. I knew nothing about speculation, and larger economic forces of which I was completely ignorant were at work.  Shortly after Superman died, he nearly took the entire comic industry with him.

May 13, 2015 Bill Romanelli