Jayson Carpenter

Back Photographer

With nearly 20 years experience working in photography, Jayson’s vision crafts authentic moments with real people. Jayson has won numerous awards, including the Crocker Kensley, and Smithsonian Magazines 6th annual photo contest, which went on to be displayed at the Smithsonian Castle.  Jayson’s images have graced the pages of numerous national and local publications including, Oprah Magazine, Dwell, Hour Detroit, Sacramento Magazine, Runners World and Sunset books. Jayson’s true passion is helping others, with extensive experience working with major NGO and Non profits abroad, including The Make a Wish foundation and Oxfam India, The one foundation Thailand, and Peace Boat in Japan.

By this person

Lobbyist Bill Ceyer Associates Inc. wrote portions of the Williamson Act in the 1960s. Today, he's trying to save it.

Farm Aid

Is the Williamson Act the next state budget casualty

At age 45, the Williamson Act may be dying.

Designed to protect agricultural land from development, the Williamson Act gives tax breaks to landowners to ease some of the financial pressure to sell out. In an era of multibillion

At age 45, the Williamson Act may be dying.

Designed to protect agricultural land from development, the Williamson Act gives tax breaks to landowners to ease some of the financial pressure to sell out. In an era of multibillion

Mar 31, 2010 Robert Celaschi
Andrew Cook, assistant manager, Utrecht Art Supplies

Browsers & Shoppers

Retailers check consumers' pulse with social media

As shopkeepers have done for thousands of years, Andrew Cook talks with his customers about what he ought to carry at the Utrecht Art Supplies store on Howe Avenue. The difference is that Cook, Utrecht’s assistant manager, holds the conversations on Facebook. The store had nearly 800 fans as of late November.

Dec 1, 2009 Robert Celaschi
Elk Slough, near the Delta town of Clarksburg

Peripheral Vision

Can state and federal officials agree on comprehensive reform before it's too late?

For centuries, the biggest environmental concern for most California water users was how to squeeze every last drop from nature. While a wet year might shift concerns to flood control, grab-as-grab-can gusto came back almost as soon as the waters receded. But that was then. Today, environmental concerns are center stage in the state’s ongoing effort to reform its water system.

Nov 1, 2009 Rich Ehisen
Alfalfa fields near the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Steamboat Slough.

Spending Water Like Money

When conservation alone can't solve the state's water problems

For many environmentalists and residents of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the solution to California’s water supply sounds brilliant in its simplicity: Use less than we do now, particularly in areas of the state that have precious little of their own to begin with, thereby eliminating the need for spending billions of dollars on new water storage. But don’t try selling that idea to the bulk of California’s most powerful water stakeholders, many of whom contend that all the low-flow toilets and drip irrigation systems in the world won’t mean much without more dams and reservoirs to capture water during wet years and reap the benefits in dry times.

Oct 1, 2009 Rich Ehisen
The Edmund G. Brown California Aqueduct (shown here near Westley in Stanislaus County) stretches about 400 miles, carrying water from Northern California to users in the south.

Hydrating the System

The state's water woes and its faltering economy

Most recognized California as “the Golden State” long before lawmakers adopted the official nickname in 1968. But while California’s standing as the land of big ideas and golden opportunities is well-earned, so too is its recent reputation as a state in perpetual crisis. In few places is this more evident than the state’s ongoing debate over its aging and unsustainable water management system.

Sep 1, 2009 Rich Ehisen
Steve Currall, incoming dean of the Graduate School of Management at UC Davis

Passing the Buck

Are MBA programs a beneficiary of a falling economy?

Many things can claim victim status in the wake of the current economy, but local MBA programs aren’t one of them.

Despite significant tuition costs, ranging from $12,000 to $40,000, MBA programs are at worst holding steady in enrollments, and many are actually enjoying surges — not just in applications but in qualified applications.

Aug 1, 2009 Bill Romanelli
Roseville flood plain manager Garth Gaylord.

High and Dry

A flood of opportunities in Roseville

Roseville, absent of levees and flood-prone rivers, is sitting high and dry — in a good way. With infrastructure spending on hold and flood protection requirements increasing, development in neighboring communities has stalled and the future remains uncertain. 

May 1, 2009 Christine Calvin