From Setbacks to Scholar

St. John’s Shelter Program offers women a fresh start

A twice-convicted felon, Ronita Iulio thought she had blown her last chance to salvage her life and family. After being released from prison in 2008, Iulio was anxious to reunite with her three children, but instead she faced an unsympathetic court that granted full custody to her ex-husband.

Jan 3, 2014 Laurie Lauletta-Boshart

Stores of Opportunity

Compassionate Planet Thrift offers job training to those in need

In her teens, Velvet Edwards dropped out of Lincoln High School to care for her mother, who had hepatitis and scoliosis. By 22, she had few life skills and no high school diploma as she watched her mother slowly disappear.  “Toward the end, her organs just started to shut down, and she faded away,” says Edwards, now 28. 

Dec 1, 2013 Stephanie Flores

Philanthropy Isn’t What It Used to Be

Acuity with Crocker CEO Lial Jones

Since August 1999, Lial Jones has served as director of the Crocker Art Museum. During her tenure, she has led a capital campaign that successfully raised more than $120 million to finance the Teel Family Pavilion, a 125,000-square-foot addition that opened in October of 2010.

Dec 1, 2013 Douglas Curley
William Roby, executive director, El Dorado Community Foundation

Sustainable Giving

A lasting strategy for philanthropy in El Dorado County

A little more than six years ago, the El Dorado Community Foundation tapped William Roby to become its new executive director. Roby had been working for the foundation for only a year as its program director, but the board was seeking a fresh personality to lead the organization. Since then, Roby has concentrated on one goal: getting the foundation to a point of fiscal sustainability so it can pay its own way.

Jul 31, 2013 Douglas Curley
Photo by Tim Engle

Along for the Ride

Second chances for needy horses

Alyssah Schafer was born with a congenital heart defect and has never been able to run or compete in sports. Over time, her friends drifted away, and the girl became depressed. But then she met a mustang named Montana at All About Equine, a horse rescue and rehabilitation organization in El Dorado Hills.  

Feb 12, 2013 Dixie Reid

Looking Up

Men of character guiding fatherless youth

Bill Coibion’s commitment to transforming lives in his Del Paso Heights neighborhood began in the mid-1990s when he launched the nonprofit Shoulder to Shoulder. He had just become a Christian and felt called to encourage men to be “servant-leaders” at home, in church and in their communities. 

Jan 1, 2013 Dixie Reid

The Giving Divide

Why is the Capital Region so stingy?

Earlier this year, most locals couldn’t help but overhear buzz about the launch of local eateries like The Red Rabbit and Pour House. Imagine that same tenor about contributing to local charities.

Dec 1, 2012 Andrea Kennedy

Sister, Mother, Mentor

In 2001, a group of local businesswomen put their heads and dollars together, hoping to make an impact on the lives of Sacramento foster youth.

Sep 30, 2012 John Blomster

Calculating the Value of Nonprofits

Giving is good business

The equation is easy to understand: A weak economy equals challenging business conditions equals reduced corporate support for nonprofits. Understandable, yes, but terribly unfortunate — and, I’m convinced, not particularly good business.

Jun 30, 2012 Winnie Comstock-Carlson

Drink for a Cause

Young social entrepreneurs value altruism over profits

Ashley Coleman has wine in her blood. Great-granddaughter of winemaker Julio Gallo, she grew up tending grapes in the family vineyard and working at its winery in Livingston. She knew the family business would color her future, but she never dreamed she would use wine to drive social change.

Mar 1, 2012 Carol Crenshaw