Kyle Monk

Back Photographer

Kyle Monk has an elegant and unique style blending minimalism with story telling. His work specializes in a range of expertise, covering a broad gamut – from conceptual and fine art to documentary. A perfectionist, he believes his education will never be complete and lives to challenge his talents. Kyle’s easy going personality and modest demeanor give comfort and the confidence to all the subjects he works with, even if they have never been photographed professionally before. He is constantly reinventing himself, collaborating with other artists on personal projects and always pushing the bar of photography.

Kyle was featured in Digital Photo Pro Magazine as a professional to keep an eye on. “Sometimes quirky, always stylish, Kyle Monk brings a sense of humor and a flair for the whimsical to his photography.” Monk lives in Los Angeles and continues to shoot for local/national magazines and agencies.

By this person

American Dreams

Punjabis in California overcame decades of discriminatory laws to build a new home for themselves in Yuba City —  and the community flourishes today

As the legend goes, Didar Singh Bains arrived in his new home of Yuba City in 1958 at age 18 with only $8 in his pocket, which was enough for him. A young immigrant from India with humble origins, he says he believed that in the U.S. “money could grow on trees.” In the course of his lifetime, that youthful optimism has proven true — at least figuratively.

Jul 11, 2017 Sena Christian

An Open Book

The open-source movement has taken on patient health — and one local woman is in the vanguard

In the Sacramento region, at least one major medical provider is already on the same page with the benefits of OpenNotes. Across the country, an estimated 13 million patients can now access their notes. This open-source movement, proponents say, represents a shift away from a paternalistic model of medical care and toward a model of fully-engaged and informed patients. And that, they argue, is better for everyone.

May 16, 2017 Sena Christian

Side Effects

Right-to-try laws could give patients access to experimental drugs, but the risks are extreme

Many of us are familiar with Woodroof’s plight — it was the subject of the critically acclaimed movie “The Dallas Buyers Club.” But while Hollywood took many liberties in telling his story, Woodroof’s real-life dilemma is one still being shared by many terminally ill people today. That struggle is also at the heart of a movement to allow those patients access to drugs the FDA has not authorized.

Sep 8, 2015 Rich Ehisen
Bernadette Austin, project manager, Domus Development; and Meea Kang, president and founding partner, Domus Development

Cracking the Glass

Local leaders weigh in on the state of gender equality in the workplace

Focusing on four sectors — STEM, justice, development and investment — we rounded up some of the city’s key leaders: a district attorney, a med school dean, the head of an FBI office and enough CEOs to rival “Shark Tank,” to get their take on how women are perceived in their industries, how that perception has changed over time and what it will take to truly reach parity.

May 5, 2015 Jeff Wilser
Alysia Angel, youth programs coordinator, Sacramento LGBT Community Center

Turned Out

Who can meet the needs of our homeless LGBT youth?

Forty percent of homeless youth are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered, compared to just 10 percent for the larger population. Across the United States, there are somewhere around 320,000 to 400,000 homeless LGBT youth. There are roughly 4,000 shelter beds total. Enough to sleep just one percent.

Apr 7, 2015 Jeff Wilser

The Next Wave

10 young professionals on our radar for 2015

Momentum is shifting in the Capital Region, and young professionals are leading the charge. General skepticism is being replaced with emerging optimism and a renewed energy that’s providing the catalyst for growth and innovation across our cities.  Here are the top ten young leaders we think you should be watching. They are driving the Capital Region’s evolution, and we anticipate you’ll see them at the forefront in 2015 and decades to come.

Mar 17, 2015 Laurie Lauletta-Boshart
Josh, a 14-year-old foster child, had been abused and neglected and was failing at school. His focus and outlook changed dramatically once a court appointed special advocate stepped in on his behalf.

Seen & Not Heard

Child advocates could fundamentally shift foster care outcomes, if only there were more volunteers

Over half a million kids live in foster care in the U.S. as a result of abuse, neglect or abandonment. Because they can’t advocate for themselves, many become victims a second time, lost in an overburdened child welfare system that can’t pay close attention to each child. But one program is drastically improving outcomes for foster youth, despite the overwhelming odds.

Oct 14, 2014 Laurie Lauletta-Boshart
Eric Richards, 35, with two-year-old son, Cole

Daddy Issues

Why aren't more men taking paternity leave?

On opening day of the 2014 baseball season, New York Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy was noticeably absent. He wasn’t benched. He didn’t have the flu. He simply took advantage of Major League Baseball’s paternity leave policy, which grants 72 hours off, to attend the birth of his son.

And all hell broke loose.

Jul 1, 2014 Jeff Wilser

Responsive Design

Creative Director Phil Tretheway

In today’s on-demand marketplace of real-time information delivered to mobile devices at lightening speeds, smart design is crucial for business success. And as the creative half of marketing firm Position Interactive, Phil Tretheway, 34, knows that without strategic and compelling design, consumers will pass his clients by.

Dec 1, 2013 Kibkabe Araya

Spacial Vision

Interior Designer Katrina Stumbos

Within three and a half years, 26-year-old Katrina Stumbos has transitioned from college graduate to business owner.

In her newly minted office on Fair Oaks Boulevard, Stumbos invites clients to brainstorm their dream spaces inside her treasure trove of fabrics, woods, wallpapers and tiles.

Dec 1, 2013 Kibkabe Araya

Styles to Strut

Fashion designer Richard Hallmarq

It’s been an extraordinary couple of years for Richard Hallmarq, the 41-year-old Sacramento native who last year made his fashion debut on national television and is now gearing up for New York Fashion Week from his design studio inside the Sacramento Art Complex on K Street.

Dec 1, 2013 Kibkabe Araya

Hard Art

Metal Designer Thomas Ramey

Sacramento has not been kind to Thomas Ramey, though he loves the city and hopes it will someday let him succeed. A Southern California transplant, he’s accustomed to clients who value his contemporary metal sculptures, modern architectural design elements and hand-fabricated furniture.

Dec 1, 2013 Kibkabe Araya

Battle of the Bulge

You might need a repair down there

When the pain began, Kevin assumed it was indigestion. He would occasionally experience bowel irregularity but would return to work anyway, fixing hot rods at a body shop in Carmichael. The 53-year-old didn’t grow alarmed until after about eight months, when he noticed a protrusion emitting from the side of his groin like a blister.

Mar 1, 2013 Rob Janis

Hope for the Iffy Stiffy

Miracle drug or fake science?

Low testosterone. For men, these words have the same foul odor as “impotence,” “shrinkage” or “Justin Bieber.” The topic is taboo. Throughout civilization testosterone has been prized as the lifeblood of manhood, so a deficit would imply, by definition, that we are somehow less manly.

Mar 1, 2013 Jeff Wilser

Million-Dollar Babies

Starting a family needn’t push retirement out of reach

Michael and Susan Pope had witnessed enough of parenthood to give them second thoughts about having children of their own. After seeing friends vanish into an abyss of diaper bags, sleepless nights, stress, arguments and the apparent loss of every conceivable freedom, they had plenty of reasons to reconsider.

Mar 1, 2013 Bill Romanelli

Economic Evolution

It’s slow growing out there

Congratulations Sacramento. You finally got the economic recovery you’ve been asking for. 

It’s not as big or fast as you had wished for, but give it time. It should get stronger as we move toward 2014.

Jan 1, 2013 Robert Celaschi

Rational Approach

Managing mental health in the workplace

A few years ago, Troy Underwood noticed a problem with one of his accountants. The man’s work performance and personal appearance had deteriorated, he talked constantly on the phone with his children and agonized about his domestic life. 

Jan 1, 2013 Allen Young

Alternative Lifestyle

In holistic medicine, patients find healing and hogwash

On a spring day in 2011, 60-year-old Russell Edgar checked himself into a 14-day Newstart residential program at the Weimar Center. In the Sierra Nevada foothills above Sacramento, the center promised to teach people with diabetes, obesity and cancer how to reverse their health problems through natural healing methods.

Sep 1, 2012 Jean Yung

Let’s Twist Again

Banks struggle with large debt and minimal borrowers

The Federal Reserve calls it Operation Twist, named after the 1961 Chubby Checker hit that sparked gyrating hips in dance halls across America. That was also the first year the Fed embarked on a mission to purchase long-term Treasury notes in an effort to drive down interest rates on long-term loans.

Feb 1, 2012 Allen Young

Divine & Conquer

Chancellor Katehi's plan for prosperity

While institutions of higher learning across the state are reeling from budget cuts, tuition hikes, course reductions and faculty and student unrest, Chancellor Linda Katehi has calmly put together a business plan for expansion and prosperity at UC Davis.

Aug 1, 2011 Douglas Curley

C-Level Change

MBA offerings evolve with students and the economy

It’s been said a down economy is a boon for Masters of Business Administration programs. The fact that the region has kept the healthy crop of MBA schools it had in 2007, before the economy turned, and even added one would suggest the maxim holds true. But it’s no free ride.

Aug 1, 2011 Bill Romanelli

Proper Precautions

Preparing for and responding to unpredictable disasters

The last sound anyone wants to hear is a firetruck siren. But last fall, that unsettling sound rang in the middle of the night as a three-alarm fire leaped from an apartment building in midtown Sacramento to the roof of J Street Recorders, home of the multiplatinum blues metal band Tesla.

Mar 1, 2011 Russell Nichols
Jim Leet, chairman McDonough Holland & Allen PC

Billable Solution

When attorneys and clients negotiate fees

Stop me if you’ve heard this one: A lawyer dies young and arrives at the Pearly Gates. 

“There must be some mistake!” he wails. “I’m only 31!”

St. Peter consults the records and disagrees. “Judging by the number of hours you’ve billed, you’re at least 73.”

Feb 2, 2010 Adam Weintraub
Christee Owens, co-owner and president of Icing on the Cupcake, has sent cease-and-desist letters regarding branding issues.

Brand of Others

When it's time to protect your company

Don’t mess with Icing on the Cupcake. The two-year-old specialty bakery in Rocklin has trademarked its name and isn’t shy about protecting it. Go open your own boutique bakery and sell cupcakes if you want, but steer clear of that brand name if you don’t want to hear from a lawyer.

Jan 1, 2010 Robert Celaschi