Amber Stott

Back Writer

Amber K. Stott is founder and chief food genius of the nonprofit Food Literacy Center. She’s creator of the California-wide Food Literacy Month and a freelance food writer. She’s been named “Food Revolution Hero” by Jamie Oliver Food Foundation, Food Tank’s 20 Innovators Protecting the Planet and a TEDx Sacramento Changemaker Fellow. 

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The Capital Region’s Food Systems 101

How nonprofits improve local health, the environment and economy

In America’s farm-to-fork capital, it’s easy to place attention on the fork side of the story – the amazing chefs and restaurants feeding us. Yet, there’s a complicated web of grassroots services, part of a larger food system, which covers everything including health, environment, economy, social justice and more. Nonprofits provide core services that keep this delicate system moving toward a better community. Comstock’s explores this side of Sacramento’s local food network.

Dec 15, 2017 Amber Stott

Meet Three of the Capital Region’s Women Farmers

While California boasts some of the highest numbers of female farmers in the U.S., at 33 percent of the state’s total farmers, that’s still only one in seven farmers. Yet, the women who have chosen this profession don’t see themselves as statistics. They see themselves as hard workers feeding their communities.

Comstock’s recently spoke with three women about the joys and challenges of running small farms.

Nov 22, 2017 Amber Stott

First Mother Farms Launches in West Sacramento

Graduate of California Farm Academy branches out into business ownership

For every 1 farmer over age 25, there’s 5 over age 75, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. America’s farmers are aging out of the business that feeds us, and Center for Land-Based Learning is focused on resolving this problem before it’s too late. To date, they have trained 96 future farmers, 17 of whom have purchased their own land and started farms.

May 30, 2017 Amber Stott

Farm-to-School Programs Make for Healthier Children

Federally-funded programs translate to sustainable farms and healthier children. Yet, despite improved efforts, funding remains lower than demand. In a state that produces half of the nation’s fruits and veggies, California stands to benefit by funding these programs.

Mar 29, 2017 Amber Stott

Hawaii By the Bite

The island state’s farm-to-fork story is much broader than the pineapple

On the plane to Hawaii, pictures of dolphins and clear blue beach water tempt eager travelers. Flight attendants’ uniforms include plumeria flowers in their hair. The tangible experience of aloha begins 10,000 feet above sea level, long before anyone’s snorkels touch the Pacific Ocean. Hawaii is not only a draw for beach-goers. It’s also a delicious destination for vacationers like me: food adventurers in search of what the locals grow and eat.

Dec 27, 2016 Amber Stott
Randy Stannard is the executive director of Oak Park Sol in Sacramento. (Photo courtesy Amber Stott)

Oak Park Sol Brings Nature Back to City Dwellers

New urban land trust builds community gardens, holds cooking classes

Oak Park’s Broadway throbs as bass bumps from one car and another’s engine belches. Someone honks their horn. Other cars buzz by well above the speed limit. This is urban living. But it doesn’t have to be. Thanks to Oak Park Sol, a newly-formed nonprofit serving as an urban land trust, this neighborhood is bringing nature back to its city-dwelling folks.

Jun 27, 2016 Amber Stott
(Shutterstock)

An Interview with the ‘Gangsta Gardener’

Urban gardening superhero Ron Finley recently screened his documentary in Sacramento

Ron Finley deemed himself the “Gangsta Gardener” with pride.He recently paid a visit to Sacramento’s urban gardening community for a screening of his documentary film, “Can You Dig This” at the Guild Theater, an event hosted by the Yisrael Family Farms. He took a moment to chat with Comstock’s about how gardens can improve communities.

Apr 20, 2016 Amber Stott
(Shutterstock)

Millennials in the Food Movement

Ideas that are turning the food industry on its head

When it comes to food, millennials are twice as likely as any other generation to give a whisk about organic and locally-sourced meals. Some even credit millennials’ disdain for junk food with the downward fiscal spiral of the country’s top 25 food and beverage industries. Though it may seem simple, these ideas are turning the food industry on its head.

Mar 11, 2016 Amber Stott
(Shutterstock)

The High Cost of Cheap Food

The problem with calling the food movement ‘elitist’

Americans spend very little of our overall incomes on food, only 10 percent, allowing us more expendable income than people in many other countries. In France and Japan, they spend 14 percent on food, and in the Philippines they spend 40 percent. In a system where food jobs rely on the success of food sales, cheap food creates a vicious cycle of poverty. Not surprisingly, the adverse is also true: More expensive food can create better jobs.

Jan 13, 2016 Amber Stott
(Marita Madeloni of Madeloni Photography)

Sacramento Urban Farmer to Start Food Academy after Visit to Milan

South Sacramento urban farmer, Chanowk Yisrael, wants to see local food systems improve. Eight years ago, he started growing organic food for his family and eventually launched the Yisrael Family Urban Farm in Sacramento’s historic Oak Park neighborhood. Now, he’s expanding that vision to motivate Sacramento youth to become more engaged in changing our local food system — announcing today that he’ll be partnering with Slow Food Sacramento to charter the city’s first Food Academy.

Dec 10, 2015 Amber Stott
(Photo: courtesy of Full Belly Farm)

Harvesting a Heritage

At Full Belly Farms, succession hinges on the creativity of younger generations

Every week, 330 American farmers leave their land for good. And as an aging population of baby-boomer farmers retire, their jobs aren’t being filled quickly enough. Only six percent of all farmers are under the age of 35. But as the national food movement strengthens, will we see a return to farming? What about the children of these aging farmers — will they love their farm land or leave it?

Sep 23, 2015 Amber Stott